Seaborn launches six global internet exchange locations

Seaborn launches six global internet exchange locations

17 January 2020 | Natalie Bannerman

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Seaborn Networks has announced the launch of six new high-capacity connectivity locations from its Seabras-1 IP Network to global internet exchanges.

The first is in Amsterdam at AMS-IX facility, the second is the DE-CIX exchange in Frankfurt and the third is the London Internet Exchange (LINX), all of which went live on January 6 2020. The remaining three locations are the Equinix internet exchange (SV1) in San Jose, the Coresite Any2 internet exchange in Los Angeles and the Equinix internet exchange in Ashburn (DC4) are all due to go live at the end of January.

“We continue to see tremendous growth across our high-quality IP Network as we develop new and innovative connectivity options for our customers through our transit and peering fabric or by enabling direct, high capacity connectivity to our IX partners,” said Seaborn COO Andy Bax. “Through these high capacity IX connections, we want our customers to enjoy remote peering services across an ever-growing number of strategic global exchanges. January is just the start of this exciting expansion of our IP network and we look forward to announcing more global exchanges for Seabras-1 being on-net for Seaborn shortly.”

Seaborn’s IP network became officially operational in October last year with connections in São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, New Jersey and New York. As such the company is able to deliver high-capacity connections to transit services, content providers and major peering exchanges in those regions.

At the time Larry Schwartz, chairman and CEO of Seaborn said: “Our IP network is ideal for ISPs in Brazil looking for quality connections to top content with high levels of adjacency for their customers, and content providers looking to get closer to their end users via Tier 1 mobile and broadband operators in Brazil. Seaborn’s IP network is a solutions-based approach, designed to enable success and growth without throttling and congestion traditionally associated with services in that region.”