News

Nautilus floats first river edge data centre in California

Nautilus Data Technologies - Stockton California.jpg

Nautilus Data Technologies has finally commissioned its first floating data centre at the Port of Stockton in California, using recycled river water.

The 10,000 sq ft Stockton 1 supports 7MW of critical IT load in four vaults. The campus (pictured) is located within a Tier 1 Homeland Security Port - offering enhanced security - and is located outside of seismic zones and floodplains.

The facility is carrier-neutral and connected to an 18 mile, 288-strand redundant fibre ring that links to the local carrier hotel, providing direct connectivity to all cloud and communication providers.

The company's TRUE (Total Resource Usage Effectiveness) system is used to deliver the computing power needed by clients.

Typical data centres guzzle local drinking water to keep systems cool. By one estimate, said Nautilus, traditional evaporative air-cooling annually consumes up to 8 million gallons of water for each megawatt (MW) of energy needed to run a facility.

Nautilus' Stockton facility uses a “zero-impact cooling system”, with no water consumption, no refrigerants, no water treatment chemicals, no wastewater and no harm to wildlife.

The technology allows high-density computing at more than 100kW a rack, “opening the door to wide-scale availability” of more powerful high-performance computing applications using artificial intelligence and machine learning, the firm says.

“The rapidly growing data centre sector is just as rapidly on the way to becoming utterly unsustainable,” said James Connaughton, CEO of Nautilus. “Our goal is to transform the data centre sector into one that is higher-performing, dramatically more sustainable and more rapidly and equitably able to serve communities, government and businesses globally.”

Nautilus was founded in 2015 and secured over $100m from investors as it moved to launching its first facility.