Eirgrid to depend on fossil fuel power stations as data centre demand grows
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Eirgrid to depend on fossil fuel power stations as data centre demand grows

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Eirgrid will be relying on new fossil fuel power stations to provide a stable power supply to keep up with the growing demand from data centres.

According to the Business Post, Eirgrid told its data centre customers at the end of January that electricity supply issues in the Dublin region would linger over the next few years due to certain challenges.

Eirgrid’s 2019 analysis revealed that demand from data centres could account for 29% of all demand in Ireland by 2028 in our Median demand scenario.

In Ireland, the growth in energy demand for the next ten years varies between 23% in the low demand scenario, to 47% in the high scenario.

Elsewhere, EirGrid has been asked by the Irish Government to transform the electricity system in anticipation of a future without coal, oil, peat and ultimately one with net zero emissions.

It must redevelop the grid to manage 70% of Ireland’s electricity coming from renewable sources by 2030, according to the company.

EirGrid and the Minister for the Environment, Climate and Communications Eamon Ryan TD launched a nationwide consultation on the future of Ireland’s electricity system.

“The grid requires an unprecedented change in the next ten years,” said Mark Foley, EirGrid Group Chief Executive.

“This transition to clean electricity will affect everyone in Ireland and will unquestionably be difficult; however the benefits will be truly transformative at both a societal and an economic level.

“Because of this, we are hosting a nationwide consultation to find an agreed approach to reach the 2030 targets. We want to collaborate with the public and all stakeholders.”

EirGrid develops and operates the national electricity grid. The grid takes electricity from where it is generated and delivers it to the distribution network, operated by ESB, which powers every home, business, school, hospital, factory and farm on the island. The company also supply power directly to some of Ireland’s largest energy users.

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