ROOT Data Center to expand its Montréal R1 data centre campus

10 August 2018 | Natalie Bannerman

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ROOT Data Center has announced plans to build a third data centre to become part of its MTL-R1 La Salle campus in Montréal.

MTL-R1B, the third data centre, is a greenfield development that will create an additional 10MW of power capacity, meeting the demands of ROOT’s future and existing customers.

“As their businesses grow, our customers depend upon us to provide the additional capacity necessary to ensure expansion can take place and meet the increasingly fast growth rates of our customers,” said AJ Byers, president and CEO of ROOT Data Center. “With a commitment to evolving alongside new and future tenants, ROOT is helping to make Montréal a data centre location of choice for growing global enterprises, ultimately boosting the region’s economy.”

The news follows ROOT’s recent announcement that it was expanding its MTL-R2 facility by adding two new data halls with an additional 6MW of power capacity. At the time the company said it was meet the growing demand from cloud providers and enterprises, and is due to be completed by the end of summer 2018.

Approximately 20% of the new MTL-R1B facility’s capacity has been sold prior to construction, a fact that ROOT says ‘demonstrates its ability to grow and expand as necessary to meet their evolving demand.”

The growing expansion of cloud-based companies has contributed heavily to the large increase in data generation, forcing data centre operators to find new ways to secure the necessary capacity to serve these large cloud deployments without exhausting energy resources.

ROOT’s location in Montréal offers various strategic benefits for businesses looking to house their store their data in Canada. With almost 100% hydro-electrically generated energy, cool climate, some of the lowest power rates in North America and positioned along one of the most heavily-trafficked routes on the internet connecting Europe with the US, ROOT data centres are ideally positioned to ensure low-latency connectivity for international business operations.

In a previous exclusive interview with Capacity Byers said: “When the cloud came in 5-8 years ago, there was a huge shift and much of the colocation business today is enterprises and SMB’s buying directly from cloud service providers, who have a very clear idea of what they want. Cost is a very big item as well as green/renewable energy and speed.”